Episode 124: Black Panther

February 19, 2018

This week on Black on Black Cinema, the guys are back to discuss the latest Marvel film, and the show's first comic book movie, Black Panther. Not just an exciting comic book film, but there is so much more to Ryan Coogler's third film of his career.

Making his big onscreen debut in Captain America: Civil War, the character of Black Panther/T'Challa (Chadwick Boseman) gets to finally step out on his own solo adventure. While the wait was long, it was more than worth it. Director Ryan Coogler manages to deliver Marvel's most diverse and unique adventure to date. Taking place in the fictional country of Wakanda, a hidden gem of Africa with technology that far surpasses the rest of the world, we see the coronation of the new king T'Challa. After watching his father be murdered in Captain America: Civil War, he must become the new leader of his people and learn to balance that with his superheroics and need to be a good man.

T'Challa will be challenged not only at home by other tribes but also from enemies from afar, including the arms dealer Ulysses Klaue (Andy Serkis) and a newcomer, Erik "Killmonger" Stevens (Michael B. Jordan) whose background is most complex than it appears. T'Challa does have the benefit of not having to fight alone. He is supported by his tech genius sister Shuri (Letitia Wright), head of his royal guard, the Dora Milage, Okoye (Danai Gurira), and his former lover and spy operative Nakia (Lupita Nyong'o).

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Quincy Jones and Getting Old and Black and Preview to Episode 124

February 16, 2018

The guys have decided to toss away their previous movie choice and jump right in and handle the likely biggest Black film in the last 10 years and probably for the next 10, Black Panther. The first comic book movie that has ever been done on the show, but a timely and important one. Marvel's latest film isn't just a run of the mill action adventure (though those elements are there), but there is an undercurrent of Blackness that runs through the film that it deserved the Black on Black Cinema full treatment. The preview topic this week is all about Quincy Jones' interview with Vulture in which he spills the beans on Michael Jackson, Marlon Brando, Ivanka Trump, Richard Pryor, Marvin Gaye, and many others. We also get into how freeing it is to be old and Black.

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Episode 123: Barbershop: The Next Cut

February 7, 2018

This week on Black on Black Cinema, the guys are back to discuss the 2016 comedy film, Barbershop: The Next Cut. This is the third movie in the Ice Cube led Barbershop series. We are once again taken to Chicago to Calvin's Barbershop to deal with Black issues that are brought up in the shop as well as movements of fighting against Chicago's gang problem.

Ice Cube is joined by Common, Nicki Minaj, Cedric the Entertainer, Regina Hall, Deon Cole, Eve, Anthony Anderson, and many others to once again showcase one of the most important staples in Black America, the Barbershop (and Beauty Shop).

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We Answer your Questions and Preview to Episode 123

January 31, 2018

This week on a new preview episode of Black on Black Cinema, the guys (minus Terrence) are back to introduce the next film to be reviewed, Barbershop: The Next Cut. The random topic of the week will just be a mailbag episode. We asked our fan group to drop some questions/topics they wanted us to address and we did so...enjoy!

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Episode 122: Detroit

January 23, 2018

Detroit is a 2017 American period crime drama film directed by Kathryn Bigelow and written by Mark Boal. Based on the Algiers Motel incident during Detroit's 1967 12th Street Riot, the film's release commemorated the 50th anniversary of the event. The film stars John Boyega, Will Poulter, Algee Smith, Jason Mitchell, John Krasinski and Anthony Mackie.

The film is a depiction of the 12th street riots' beginning and then pivots to the specific events inside the Algiers Motel and the subsequent trial that followed. Dealing with the physical as well as, psychological damage that is inflicted on these teenagers who find themselves being blamed for shooting at the military and local police. Issues of racial injustice, police brutality, character assassinations, and more are peppered throughout the film. The hosts discuss not only the film but the controversies and criticisms that surrounded it.

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MLK Jr’s Dream in 2018 & Preview to Episode 122

January 17, 2018

This week on Black on Black Cinema, the guys are back to announce the next film, Detroit. Detailing the infamous Algiers Motel incident during the Detroit riots in the 1960s. The random topic of the week deals with a look at MLK Jr.'s dream for America and how close we've come to achieving it and how much further we have to go.

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Episode 121: The Preacher’s Son

January 9, 2018

Bishop T.K. Wilson and his wife run a respectable church in their community alongside their two children Dante and Donna. However, as with all things, the mask of the church folk begin to slip and secrets begin to find their way to the surface. Hidden relationships, life choices, and respectability are all challenged. Will the church family and congregation be able to withstand this ever-mounting and frankly an insane number of challenges?

The Preacher's Son is based on the popular Carl Weber book of the same name, and is the first of the Black Church trilogy

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Dating Outside the Community & Preview to Episode 121

January 3, 2018

This week on Black on Black Cinema, introduce the next film, The Preacher's Son. The story of a family that has a father who is the pastor of a church with a son who has a few secrets of his own. For the random topic of the week, the guys discuss this controversy about the actor Michael B. Jordan dating a woman who isn't Black and how some are possibly planning to boycott his next project, Black Panther. A conversation on interracial dating acceptance, hypocrisy, self-defeating thoughts on the topic.

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Episode 120: Mudbound

December 20, 2017

Taking place in the early 1940s in the Mississippi Delta, two men (one Black, one white) find themselves on returning from serving in World War 2 to an America that hasn't changed. Dealing with issues of PTSD, both men are bound by the bigotry of their homeland, while striking up a forbidden friendship that only men who have seen the theater of war can appreciate.

Written and directed by Dee Rees (Pariah), Mudbound explores the notion of change through leaving home and seeing it with fresh eyes and perspectives. Rees places two families, the Jacksons, and the McAllans, on the opposite sides of racial oppression of the times, with its often polite bigotry that guided it.

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We All We Got & Preview to Episode 120

December 7, 2017

This week on Black on Black Cinema, the guys return to introduce the next film, the 2017 Dee Rees directed "Mudbound." The film chronicles two WW2 vets (one Black, one white) who have profoundly different experiences with racism and PTSD after returning home from war. The hosts also discuss the preview topic of taking advantage of/or underappreciating Black support.

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